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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 234 (some duplicates have been removed)
as a law student at harvard. video at a press conference where obama says nothing news worthy. that was explosive tape, not at all. last month it was the drudge report, which means the romney c campaign, it was them again dousing themselves in gasoline and pulling the fire alarm as what was hyped as outrageous video of president obama saying he believes in redistribution. specifically it was that he believes essentially in the progressive tax code that we have had in this country for a time period that's more easily measured in centuries than in individual years. again, not exactly a bomb shell. now they are dousing themselves in gasoline and hitting the fire alarm all over again over a video of president obama speaking as a candidate in 2007. in this video, which the right is very excited about tonight but which has been available online since 2007, mr. obama, then a candidate, acknowledges the presence in the room of his former pastor from chicago, reverend jeremiah wright. steve smith was part of the strategic team in 2008 when they decided that they would not attack barack
by melanie eversley later. you probably heard what happened in pennsylvania regarding their voter i.d. law and we will talk to her about that. we also want to take time to let you know that on our other channels on the weekend, book- tv and american history tv, we look at cities across the united states. our focus this time around is augusta, maine. not only do you get a sense of meeting the people and learning about individual cities and what makes them interesting, here is a little bit of a preview from tonight's program. [video clip] >> this is the first parish church in brunswick, maine. it is significant to the story of a uncle tom's cabin. in many ways, the story began here. it is here in pew #23 that harriet beecher stowe, by her account, saw the vision of uncle tom being whipped to to death. he is the title character, the hero of her 1852 novel," uncle tom's cabin." the story is that there is -- there was a slave, a good slave, sold by his first kind owner, mr. shelby, and he sold him to pay debts on his plantation through a series of misadventures, you might say, he ends up in the
blocked the state's stricter voter i.d. law from taking effect this november. after weeks of protests, the ruling means voters in pennsylvania will not have to show a state approved i.d. to cast ballots on election day. the judge said he was concerned that the law could prevent some people from voting. stricter voter i.d. laws in four states remain, but tougher laws in at least six other states were either shelved or watt terd down. florida, ohio and of course now pennsylvania. >>> american airlines now says it knows why passenger seats broke loose causing a pair of emergency landings. the airline originally called for eight of its planes to be inspected but later ordered 47 of its aircraft to be checked. american blames the problem on clamps that were supposed to hold the seats in place but were not properly installed. meanwhile, american and its pilots union continue a contentious renegotiation over its labor agreement. both the airline and the union representing its mechanics deny labor disputes play any role in the seat problem. >>> here's a look at stories making news today in am
, a discussion about google operations and antitrust laws. >> almost 20 years ago, we broadcast one of the most controversial stories in our 44 years on the air. it was called yes, but is it art? i was accused of being a philistia, someone lacking the esthetic ability to appreciate contemporary art. in those 20 years, works that i question worth hundreds of thousands of dollars are now worth hundreds of millions. >> what made everybody so that 20 years ago? >> i discovered something that i had absolutely could barely believe -- that when you question someone's taste in art, thanmore personal politics, religion, sexual preference. it is something that goes to the very soul when you say you b ought that? > sunday at 8:00 on c-span's q&a. now, an american enterprise institute panel discussion examining whether google is violating antitrust laws. topics included the market for internet search, and an analysis of google's business model. pedal trade commission chairman john leibovitz has said that the ftc plans to make a decision on whether to take legal action against google by the end of this year
- in-law had surgery that it would be a good idea if an older person lived on pain pills instead of having their problem taken care of. another thing, and egos around the country and talks, he looks almost like the rabble-rousers' when he goes around the country, it looks almost like a rabble rouser. host: gene is an independent. good morning at. -- jean. caller: i will not vote for paul ryan. i have been watching -- i watch c-span a lot and the commentaries on the other political channels. he does not ring true to me. i had been watching before he was on the ticket and have been following it for years with john boehner and his congress. i will not vote for anybody of john boehner's crowd. host: ok. a little bit more insight into the polling. a rasmussen poll fromepo the weekend -- is more from the vice-president on the weekends and florida. [video clip] >> they're spending a lot of time telling you what barack obama and joe biden are against and what we have done. the attack everything. the truth of the matter is that nowhere is it more clear what they would do that in medicare.
casting their presidential ballot next month. a judge has put a temporary hold on the state's new law. abc's t.j. winick explains. >> reporter: 93-year-old vivian applewhite cast her first vote for president back in 1932 for franklin roosevelt. but because she didn't have the required documents to obtain a photo i.d. she almost didn't have a chance to vote this november. it turns out applewhite will be able to vote after a judge blocked pennsylvania's controversial new voter i.d. law from taking full effect before the presidential election. >> at the end of the day this is a victory for democrats because they can argue that no longer would the kind of voters that they want to bring to the polls are encouraged to go to the polls will be turned away. at the same time, for republicans, winning pennsylvania was always a stretch. >> reporter: under the ruling voters can still be asked for identification but can't be discouraged from voting or disenfranchised if they dent have the proper i.d. >> they can go ahead and vote anyway. but the safe bet is to have i.d. and speed the whole process. >> r
if you don't have a driver's license or another i.d. like that but they didn't get away with that new law. a judge ruled this week the new rule about i.d. will not be in effect for this election. but yesterday and this was the scoop, we called the state of pennsylvania to ask some questions about voting there in that state this year. this is what we got. listen to this. it's amazing. remember, legally you can vote even if you don't have an i.d. in pennsylvania in this election. you can. listen. >> thank you for calling the pennsylvania department of state bureau of commissions, elections, and legislation. press one for english. press one for information on pennsylvania's new voter i.d. law. press two for -- >> hello. all pennsylvania voters will be required to show a photo i.d. before voting at a polling place beginning with the november 2012 general election. all photo i.d.s must be current and contain an expiration date unless otherwise noted. >> so that was our scoop last night. our bad scoop. because what you just heard there from the state of pennsylvania is not the law. but it's wha
i.d. law from taking full effect before the presidential election. >> at the end of the day this is a victory for democrats because they can argue that no longer would the kind of voters that they want to bring to the polls are encouraged to go to the polls will be turned away. at the same time, for republicans, winning pennsylvania was always a stretch. >> reporte voters can still be asked for identification but can't be discouraged from voting or disenfranchised if they dent have the proper i.d. >> they can go ahead and vote anyway. but the safe bet is to have i.d. and speed the whole process. >> reporter: supporters of voter i.d.s say the laws weren't passed to exclude voters just to protect against voepter fraud. critics say the real issue is voter suppression, not voter fraud, pointing out nearly every state legislature that passed tougher voter i.d. laws is controlled by republicans. >> this is a victory today for the people and a loss for the scheming and lying legislators in harrisburg who thought they could hijack the presidential election. >> reporter: the judge's
warning those workers. here's the federal law and what it says. it says that companies with 100 or more workers must provide 60 days notice before mass layoffs or plant closings, or those workers can get up to 60 days of back pay if they are not notified. the republicans are crying foul and eamon javers picks under the story. >> reporter: here's what the omb said in late september -- it is neither necessary or appropriate for federal contractors to provide warn act notice to employees 60 days in advance of the potential sequestration because of the uncertainty about whether sequestration will occur. i've toualked to employees at t white house and omb about this question. their idea is this -- first of all, there's uncertainty about the fiscal cliff itself, whether it is actually going to happen or not. they say that the warn act is only required for those planning specific cutbacks and specific plant closings and they say since the employers in this case federal contractors don't know that sequestration is going to happen, therefore they don't have any specific information. and also the
limited. a duty for liberty and right to keep me free and uphold the rule of law to ensure the system if we suffer injury in the physical sense or through fraud. the government can't keep us safe and it's so limited they should not be telling me that i have to buy health insurance or i will get taxed more. what should the role of government be in your life we are asking you in this morning's journal. it states in the constitution of the federal government is to do. 18 enumerations, the rest are reserved for the state's and the people. next call, jeff in texas. good morning to you, sir. >> caller: that would be kevin in washington. >> host: good morning. you are on the air. go ahead. >> caller: i believe that if the proper role of the federal government is to protect individual liberties we are supposed to have rules against that, against fraud, against the injured. but the problem is the federal government has gone way beyond that. it seems like they want to redistribute what people have gained through their liberties and freedoms and once you do that, you are violating people's liber
that was done by south chinese emperor who had never heard of law of the seas because that concept didn't exist many years ago. so the issue of the islands, and there are hundreds of islands, requires in my view first of all separating the notion of freedom of the seas from the issue of sovereignty over the islands. but my colleagues here will be held to give much fuller explanation of the issue. what i want to say is that both sides have to make up their mind that they are trying to do something that is historically unprecedented. and in a way competing countries recognize that the international system requires a victory of cooperation between, if they are not going to drift into a confrontation which will then split every other country to participate in. each side will be able to list the mistakes that the other side has made, and of course, but the one favorable thing you can say about this challenge is the most nonpartisan foreign policy in america today is the american administration since 1971 have pursued a centrally, the same course. now, two locations, two president tried to reinvent t
of the book, quote, by demanding that roberts kill our entire health care law, the four conservative justices prompted them to look for some kind of middle ground. roberts felt obligated to protect the institutional interests of the court, not just his own philosophical agenda. now, doing that, he uncost merrily went against the conservatives, members of the court. >> he certainly did and count me among those who are shocked and predicted wrongly. justice sees himself as the chief justice, as the embodiment of the court and after citizens united, after bush v. gore to do it a third time in a relatively short period of time would have damaged the court and romney found that middle ground under the taxing power of congress and he upheld the law but don't think that john roberts has suddenly. >> a mentor of mine said, be when he said that, he did not find it, they had the right to deal with interstate commerce. >> right. >> but that they could deal with tax law, most of the civil rights legislation was built around interstate commerce. >> it sure was. >> that is not a good sign for some of the s
. there were people in legal law firm conference rom, they could get an internet connection. people in starbucks where they could get an internet connection. people working at the kitchen tables around town. and all of a sudden, right around april 1st. bestart moving to the headquarter. this is literally six week aways from the announcement. and this just this big space. bigger than the room. far bigger than the room. three or four times of the size of the room. it was a whole floor of the high-rise building in chicago, and it was just kind of remarkable. we didn't have everybody in. we were slowly bringing people in. literally we were still getting the servers up. we had telephones ringing and people try to answer phone calls. we had e-mail coming in to our e-mail address. we didn't have a system to receive e nail a real way that you would want. we had many coming many. we didn't have budgets. and we had, you know, we had constituency leaders calling our political department because they wanted to have time with the candidate, we had our fundraisers, who had to raise money with the
be a violation of the law. >> joined by our pentagon correspondent, barbara starr. you've been digging into this for new information. you say as early as april, the united states sent special forces into benghazi for a specific reason. >> they did, indeed, carol. what we've learned is that a very small team of special forces commandos were sent to that benghazi compound. this was back in april. if you think back a u.n. -- united nations convoy in the region had been attacked. growing security concerns at that time back in april, about what was going on in that region in eastern libya. so, the u.s. sent a team of about four special forces, commandos to the benghazi compound. they did a security assessment. what could be done to improve security at the facility. and they recommended apparently, we are told, a couple of things that seem fairly minor in retrospect. sand bagging some positions so libyan forces who were there, contractors, essentially, could help fight back if the place came under attack and also were training for some of that private security force that was hired for the co
this matrix of election laws and systems and regulations shape who gets elected and the policy in the country and they determine or shape the level of mercury in the air that we brief, how many kids are in a classroom in the city of detroit, so they have a huge impact the we don't always appreciate. >> explain how that matrix works. where do they start and how far do they go? >> one unique thing about the united states is that we don't have a central system in terms of the election. we have got over 4,000 difrent election systems and the of different rules and laws and people who administer them said there isn't like one puppet master like some grand conspiracy. we've got all these different systems and the people that are familiar with the most common example of this which would be gerrymandering where politicians draw districts that favor them. congress is about a 14 or 15% approval rating or maybe even lower than that. yet 85% of members of congress are safe because they have drawn their districts or state legislatures have drawn their districts so that those members are safe so that is th
law school graduates, romney also was a harvard mba, will square off and try to tell americans that they're very relatable. [laughter] we'll look forward to that. all right, chris, thank you. >> thank you. megyn: well, these debates, i mean, they're great theater for the american public, and they really do help a lot of americans decide whether it's just a visceral reaction or i like that guy better, they help americans decide. and a lot of the times it's the gaffes that turn people against the candidates. these campaigns, they're searching for the one defining moment, but of course they're also hoping it won't be an awkward one that sinks their campaign. recall 1992 when president george h.w. bush checks his watch during a debate with then-candidate bill clinton. the gesture gave voters the impression that he was impatient and uninterested. during the 2000 presidential debates, al gore got up in governor george w. bush's grill. look. [laughter] just a classic moment where he was invading his personal space a little, and, boy, did he take some flak. mr. bush gave him a nod and
behind the most of the people being evicted out of the city of san francisco in terms of the laws that they lay, what they're, the arrogance of their position. when you have the residents go before them because they are not being, they are not under the eye of observation. then you really see the bad side of why you need to bring this organization to the light where they could be observed. i think it's a good thing but by the same, we need it done like 25 years ago. >> thank you. >> thank you very much. next speaker. >> my name is [inaudible] ladies and gentlemen. the history goes back to 25 years ago to the housing authority and my statement i have been using at your commission for years, ain't no mystery, check your history. ladies and gentlemen, there's deeper history in what we're talking about with the city government channel. i'm the one that started that, i'm not going to get the hand for that because of same things the housing authority tenants went through 20 years ago. ladies and gentlemen, i am happy, tickled not pink by black right now because most of the tenants are a
, no one could stop me, that is except the law. when police arrested him five months ago in jalalabad, during the planning of the attack. he's now awaiting trial. proudly a member of the taliban, he says no one encouraged him to do this. look at our situation the foreigners kill our people, they insult our religion, burning the holy koran and making cartoons about the profit mohammad. if we don't defend -- the methods of the the insurgents are constantly changing. the enemy don't use their old tactics, now they use women, sometimes children and teenagers, they even get dressed up in military uniforms, they don't fight face to face, they're cowards. >> the taliban denies that they use children as suicide bombers. just a few days ago, a 10-year-old boy managed to escape from insurgents whomp going to make him wear a suicide vest so he could blow himself up in front of coalition troops. this man has a 4-year-old son which he says he loves and miss very much. when i asked him how he would feel if he was used as a suicide bomber. he said if he wants to be a suicide bomber, no one can stop
. one of the first laws passed by the first congress back then. whether the defendant may be liable under those violations. a territory of a foreign sovereign. this is very important human right case that will determine whether or not victims of human right abuses can sue corporations in the united states for violations of the billion tort statute of 1789. the question -- it is no question if an billion, like an ambassador gets assaulted by an american citizen, this statute would apply. now justices are being asked if it should be much more expensive and evolving human right cases and foreign companies where there is no particular u.s. nexus. the justice has sounded skeptical of broadening this law, the application of this loss in these kind of cases. connell: peter barnes, thank you very much. dagen: you want even more on the supreme court. we have judge andrew napolitano talking with us about protecting the information on your cell phone. connell: that is coming up a little bit later on in the hour. one of the big name banks got a big write up over the weekend. we will tell you mo
correspondent mike emanuel. >> the law says mass layoffs are coming, notices should go out 60 days ahead. obama administration that isn't necessary since many are hoping a deal will be struck to avoid the cuts. even so, a ceo i talked to he will be up front with his employees. >> it makes it challenging. people come to work. we've got some of the best people in the country working for us. they come every day, they want to design the best systems that our fighters need, but it's challenging. when they sit around kitchen table at night. honey, what is going to happen? it's tough because they don't know. >> reporter: obama administration is telling contractors if they get sued for not sending out layoff notices the government will pick up the tack. lockheed martin will hold off telling workers, but two kron man sent a letter saying quote, should you rely on that guidance and fail to comply with the warren acted requirement, will you be setting up your company for serious legal and financial reprosper cushions. graham sounds pretty upset. >> in 2007, senator obama wanted to extend the notice requir
their lives. there is definite response to international law. turkey is a nato member. certain nato treaty articles bring about certain responsibilities when one of its members is attacked. we're not blinded by rage, but we will protect our rights. >> wednesday's violence marked the day this cross border flare- up between the two countries since the uprising in syria began nearly two years ago. there have been unconfirmed reports syrian troops were killed overnight. the syrian information minister said his government is investigating the attack and offered condolences to the turkish victims. >> the authorities are investigating what led to the death of the mother and her children near the syrian-turkish borders. we console the families of the mortar. >> the border violence between turkey and syria becamcame hours after dozens of people were killed in a series of bombings in aleppo. scores of iranians rallied in tehran wednesday to protest the collapse of the country's currency. it has had an all-time low amidst a worsening financial crisis brought upon by western sanctions fallen 40% again
lawsuits pending that could negate some of the new laws that are intended to require photo ids for voters? >> first observation is, in terms of the case in maryland, that was one misguided example. never should have happened. the race was not that close. it was a huge mistake by that individual and he paid for it with a time in prison. in terms of your concerns about voter i.d., and having to show id, i live in virginia and just got my voter card. they allow any kind of thing, a utility bill, or anything like that. it is a lot easier to vote then to get on an airplane. if you are worried about fraud, i think that these are reasonable requirements. >> in terms of polling, to the extent that both firms can, we try to pull a registered voter list. registered voters who have presumably -- i mean, we try to sample who have not only registered -- people who have not only registered but voted in the last election. >> in a lot of states, they have to have a photo id. how do you account for that? >> our callers asked you to show them your folder id -- your photo i.d. >> not a lot that you can do.
interest in law to tell people about this? >> we do believe genetically engineered foods are a problematic, health concerns, leads to allergies and health effects showing up in the studies that have been done. environmental problems. yesterday, the new york times had a story about the massive increases in pesticide use over the last 15 years of genetically engineered crops, tied to the crops. >> is your goal to end genetically modified foods? >> it's to give consumers the choice, that's how the market is suppose to working. we decide, voting with dollars, making choices about what we eat and feed families, about what we want in the food system. >> the bottom line for families listening, is this going to increase the cost at the grocery store? the no on campaign says yes. it's going to cost hundreds of extra dollars a year to require the labels. >> they have no evidence to back that up. we think no increased cost will come of the law, it didn't happen in europe and didn't happen when we asked for trans fats. it gives them 18 months to do it. it's a straight forward labeling law. >> yes on
the warren act that just took place where there are blatant violations of the law, i wouldn't put anything past this administration. >> you know, these are sitting members of congress. >> yeah. >> alan west won, of course. we know his party. he's very conservative nap said, john mccain. are you surprised by his comments? >> i'm very surprised by his comment. all of those comments, they're not just deeply irresponsible, but without a shred of evidence they are casting doubt about a very important number in our economy. now, if you understand the way the bureau of labor statistics collects data, and i used to work for the department of labor, and i used to work for the executive office of the white house. the firewalls are impenetrable and this is an institution that's been delivering day reports with as much integrity as you can imagine for decade upon decade. never any suggestion of political bias that's had anything close to substantiation. so if you think -- i'm a little bit -- this has gotten under my skin, alex. if you think that there's something going on there, and you don't have a s
ideas and they were bad yds ideas. bad for america and i was fighting when you were practicing law and representing your contributor in his slum landlord business in chicago. bill: if you get an he change like that wednesday night, what's the likely impact on these uncommitted or spu -- thee voters. >> both of these guys have been through an awful lot of debates in their careers. they will be well prepared. the one thing that has to be cause for optimism for republicans. usually an incumbent president comes out rusty. we saw that in 1984, reagan's first debate was a disaster. george w. bush's debate was a disaster. i don't think it will be a disaster. but you saw on the univision interview. when you are abe incumbent president you are not used to being challenged. bill: what do you think the impact of a potential exchange like we just watched will have on this 15% rasmussen is talking about? >> rich is right. it depends on what it is. there was another debate moment in 2008 that seemed to change the trajectory a little bit. remember when hillary was told people don't like her and s
has just enumerated, but also because the world has changed around us. in part because the laws our policy. we spent an awful lot of time, effort and money after world war ii creating an international system, economic system in particular to stimulate the growth in the rest of the world. so, this is the success of the policy of several decades that has made us relatively less strong in terms of disposable cash and disposable incentives to get to the behavior that we want to see. militarily, we surely are as strong as we have ever been, but we live in a world that has a number of nuclear powers and we still live in the world before 1957 that had not. so, other than us. you know, to me it hardly even seems worth debating this is a different world. >> i was told we have to debate. [inaudible] the decline is the wrong word. i think the world is getting more crowded. they are growing faster and in economic terms the u.s. will have the west shared wealth for the years ahead but there isn't a country by the way that is as jessica said that is a story of american success. it's for 60 years
for the the care they provided to the uninsured. romney took that tax and put it towards his law. so that's two pots of federal money sand a tax. so how much of romney's proposal relied on these funds? i asked jonathan gruber the mit who helped design the law. he told me 100%. that was my whole job, saying whether we could fit what he wanted to do within those three funding sources. the legislature ended up adding more money to the law after he proposed it. but the fact remains it remains on federal dollars and on state taxes. but romney's health care proposal doesn't make it easier for other states to do what he did. it makes it almost impossible. he's not offering states access to federal funds for universal coverage. here's what he's doing. >> i would like to take the medicaid dallas dollars and go to state and say you'll get what you got last year, plus inflation, plus 1% and you manage your care for your poor in the way you think best. >> that sounds nice. it's a cut to medicaid of more than $600 billion. that means medicaid will not be able to offer other states the generous deal massachu
but richmond and sunset district. i really am appreciative of the law enforcement and community-based agencies that are here with us today. how they have really worked together to try to crack down to make sure people are aware of these scams and we can as a city kind of move forward to prevent them for the future. so this hearing is on a number of these types of scams that have happened over the past few months. they tend to target older chinese women in san francisco. since january of this year there have been a series reported. again, it is older asian or chinese women. it involves the theft of jewelry and money obtained under false pretense. nearly 50 of these cases have been reported in san francisco. it's totaled over $1.5 million of losses in cash and jewelry. many of these cases also again have taken place not only in chinatown but also sunset and richmond district. similar cases also have been reported in new york, chicago, boston and seattle. i wanted to invite up a number of the reps from our law enforcement and community agencies from the police department, san francisco district a
labor department told lockheed they do not need to abide by the law. telling lockheed it will cover potential legal costs if they incur any benpality, obama administration. clearly does not want those layoff notices delivered just days before the election. >> president obama downplaying expectations for wednesday's debate. saying he is an okay debater, according to a new washington post abc news poll, 55 percent of likely voters think that president will win this first debate, and 41% think that romney will win. joining me now, ed klein, author of "new york times" best seller "the amateur." great to see you, this is cute, the downplay, one of these, i can't think of another moment of modesty on the part of this president other than this example of trying to manage expectations. >> the golden-floated orator is bumbling,. lou: the idea he is such a heavy favorite to win the debate, that has to work in governor romney's favor. >> almost 6 out of 10 americans think that obama will take this debate, romney goes in as under dog with low expectations, if he does well, he will exceed those
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 234 (some duplicates have been removed)